Why

should I

adopt a pet?

Because you’ll save a life

The number of shelter animals could be reduced dramatically if more people adopted pets instead of buying them. When you adopt, you save your animal and open up shelter space for another animal who might desperately need it.

Because you’ll get a great animal

Our Animal Shelter is brimming with happy, healthy pets that are just waiting for someone to take them home. Most of our shelter pets ended up here because of a human problem like a move or a divorce, not because the animal did anything wrong.

Because you’ll get a great bargain

When you adopt a pet, the cost of spaying/neutering, first vaccinations and sometimes micro-chipping is included in the adoption price, which means you’ve scored a major deal — a fuzzy deal who will thank you with kisses or purrs for many years to come.

If you wish to still purchase an animal

please research their origin and make sure they come from a registered and approved breeder.

Because your decor will thank you

Many of the pets from our shelter are already house trained, which means you’re not only saving a pet’s life, you may be saving your rug and furniture.

Because it’s one way to fight kitten & puppy mills

Puppy and kitten mills are “factory style” breeding facilities that put profit above the welfare of dogs and cats. Animals from puppy and kitten mills are housed in shockingly poor conditions with improper medical care, and are often very sick and behaviourally troubled as a result. The mothers of the puppies and kittens are kept in cages to be bred over and over for years, without human companionship and with little hope of ever joining a family. And after they’re no longer profitable, breeding dogs and cats are simply discarded — either killed, abandoned or sold at auction.

Most puppies and kittens in pet stores and sold online come from puppy and kitten mills. The dogs and cats are sold to unsuspecting consumers in pet stores, over the Internet and through classified ads. Puppy and kitten mills will continue to operate until people stop supporting them. By adopting a pet, you can be certain you aren’t giving them a dime.

Because an adopted pet is good for your self-esteem

Not only do animals give you unconditional love, but they have been shown to be psychologically, emotionally and physically beneficial. Caring for a companion animal can provide a sense of purpose and fulfilment and lessen feelings of loneliness and isolation in all age groups. And when you adopt, you can also feel proud about helping an animal in need.

Because you’ll change a homeless animal’s world

And get a new best friend in the bargain. Seriously, what could be better than that?

The Adoption Process

  • What to Expect:

    As a Rescue and Re-homing Shelter we ask a lot of questions of prospective adopters for two main reasons:

    1. To ensure long-term homes for the animals in our care

    2. To facilitate good matches between customers and their adopted companions.

  • What questions will I be asked before adopting?

    We require adopters to complete a quick and easy application. In addition to basic contact information, the application will include questions such as:

    • Your housing situation (renting vs. owning)
    • The number and ages of any children in your household
    • The number and type of other pets you may own
    • Your previous experience with pets
    • Your activity level, lifestyle, and expectations for a new animal
  • Why do we ask adopters so many questions?

    Consider why pets are surrendered in the first place. Among the top five reasons that people give up their pets, three are common to both dogs and cats: landlord issues, moving, and the cost of pet care. For dogs, the other most common reasons include lack of time and inadequate facilities. For cats, it’s allergies and having too many cats to care for.

    Many animals lose their homes because their owners weren’t prepared to invest the necessary money and time to care for a pet. In other cases, families and pets are mismatched. Consider these all-too-common scenarios:

    • A high-energy dog is adopted by a family that doesn’t have time for extensive daily exercise
    • A skittish kitten is chosen by rambunctious children whose parents aren’t inclined to actively supervise their kids

    To prevent such painful situations for both the pets and people involved, shelters and rescue groups carefully evaluate adopters in the hope of avoiding these mismatched relationships.

  • How can I prepare myself to adopt a pet?

    You’ll have a relationship with your pet for many years to come, so it’s worth being patient and taking your time to carefully consider what kind of pet — big or small, energetic or relaxed, older or younger — is right for you. Before you head to the shelter, ask yourself some questions that will help you figure out exactly what kind of critter will best fit your lifestyle and personality.

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